About Sending A Data Access Page In E-Mail

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When you send a data access page (data access page: A Web page, published from Access, that has a connection to a database. In a data access page, you can view, add to, edit, and manipulate the data stored in the database. A page can also include data from other sources, such as Excel.) in e-mail, there are important connection and security considerations you need to be aware of to ensure more reliable results.
Share the database
A data access page is connected to one of two types of data sources: a Microsoft Access database (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects, such as tables, queries, or forms, related to a particular topic or purpose. The Microsoft Jet database engine manages the data.) or a Microsoft SQL Server database (Microsoft SQL Server database: A database in Microsoft SQL Server, it consists of tables, views, indexes, stored procedures, functions, and triggers.). For the page to work properly when sent via e-mail, the source database must be on a shared server or shared computer in order for users to view and interact with the page.


Use UNC paths
Before you create the page, open the Microsoft Access database (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects, such as tables, queries, or forms, related to a particular topic or purpose. The Microsoft Jet database engine manages the data.) by using a universal naming convention (UNC) (universal naming convention (UNC): A naming convention for files that provides a machine-independent means of locating the file. Rather than specifying a drive letter and path, a UNC name uses the syntax \\server\share\path\filename. ) path in the File name box on the Open dialog box (File menu, Open command). This ensures that the data source of the page is defined with a UNC path instead of with the drive letter of a mapped network drive in Microsoft Windows Explorer. A drive letter can vary on a computer or may not always be defined, whereas a UNC path is a reliable and consistent way for the page to be located.
When you create the page, you should save it using a UNC path in the File name box of the Save As Data Access Page dialog box. Saving your page with a UNC path ensures that you can securely send a pointer to the page by e-mail.
Store the database and the page on the same server
To make your pages as secure as possible, put the Microsoft Access database (Microsoft Access database: A collection of data and objects, such as tables, queries, or forms, related to a particular topic or purpose. The Microsoft Jet database engine manages the data.) or Microsoft SQL Server database (Microsoft SQL Server database: A database in Microsoft SQL Server, it consists of tables, views, indexes, stored procedures, functions, and triggers.) on the same Web server (Web server: A computer that hosts Web pages and responds to requests from browsers. Also known as an HTTP server, a Web server stores files whose URLs begin with http://.) as the data access page.
Note You can't copy an Access database to or create an Access database in a folder under Network Places (Web Folders in Windows 98 and Windows NT) .
Publish from a trusted intranet security zone
Depending on the Microsoft Internet Explorer security level setting on the recipient's computer, one of three things occurs when the recipient opens an e-mail message containing a data access page: the page is automatically disabled, the recipient is asked whether to allow data access, or the page is automatically enabled.
If you are using a corporate intranet, you can publish your pages from a Web site located in a trusted security zone. This will help alleviate problems caused by the recipient's Internet Explorer security settings and thus improve performance of your pages. For more information about security levels and security zones, see Internet Explorer Help. For any specific page security requirements at your site, see your system administrator.
Send a pointer instead of a copy of the HTML source code
There are three ways Microsoft Access can send a data access page in an e-mail message.
• In the body of the message, as a copy of the HTML source code of the page
• In the body of the message, as a pointer to the HTML file associated with the page
• As an attachment to the message, including a copy of the HTML file associated with the page
In the e-mail message, a copy of the HTML source code of a page looks very different than a pointer to the page. The copy will contain all of the HTML tags and objects needed to render the page. The pointer will contain some HTML tags and the absolute path — a universal resource locator (URL) (Uniform Resource Locator (URL): An address that specifies a protocol (such as HTTP or FTP) and a location of an object, document, World Wide Web page, or other destination on the Internet or an intranet — for example: http://www.microsoft.com/.), or a universal naming convention (UNC) (universal naming convention (UNC): A naming convention for files that provides a machine-independent means of locating the file. Rather than specifying a drive letter and path, a UNC name uses the syntax \\server\share\path\filename. ) path — to the page.
It's best to avoid sending a copy of the HTML source code of a page because Microsoft Outlook won't let a user connect to data across domains unless the recipient or system administrator has changed the default Internet Explorer security zone settings. Sending a pointer to the page assumes that the page and the data source that the page connects to are located on a server or public share. This reduces the chance for cross-domain issues within Microsoft Outlook.
Sending a pointer instead of a copy of the page can also be a security precaution that reduces the risk of malicious users intercepting a copy of the HTML source code of a page that has been sent to a user, and then revising it to covertly gain access to a corporate database.
The best way to send a data access page is to send a pointer to the page in the body of the e-mail message. To send a pointer, you can do one of the following:
• Save the page to a folder under Network Places (Web Folders in Windows 98 and Windows NT) or on a Web server, so the page's location is a URL.
• Save the page to a shared computer using a UNC path.
In either case, Access uses the HTML tag to send a pointer to the page. The pointer is either the URL or the UNC path to the page. <br>When you create your e-mail message, Access provides confirmation dialog boxes to help you make the right choice.


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Blog, Updated at: 16.20

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